Symbols

The Sunwheel and Valknut

The following "SUNWHEEL" symbols are identified within the Odinist/Wotanist path.

Historical events have sometimes polluted the meaning of these ancient and spiritual symbols.

Seek to understand the truth, and look past the stigma! You will see - HONOR...

Solar Cross
Valknut
Shield Knot
Swastika
Triple Horn of Odin
A
Solar Cross
B
Valknut
C
Shield Knot
D
Swastika
E
Triple Horn
of Odin

The following is information from the website, Alternate Religion, visit them at: Alternate Religion

A.

Solar Cross: is probably the most ancient spiritual symbol in the world, appearing in Asian, American, European, and Indian religious art from the dawn of history. Composed of a equal armed cross within a circle, it represents the solar calendar- the movements of the sun, marked by the solstices. Sometimes the equinoxes are marked as well, giving an eight armed wheel. (The swastika is also a form of Solar cross, emphasizing movement.)

The cross in its most simplified form (shown above) is known in Northern Europe as Odin's cross, after the Chief God of the Norse pantheon. It is often used as an emblem by Odinists, followers of the Norse religion.
 

B.

Valknut: found on old Norse stone carvings is called "Hrungnir's heart," after the legendary giant of the Eddas. It is best known as the Valknut, or "knot of the slain," and it has been found on stone carvings with funerary motifs, where it signified the afterlife. The valknut can be drawn unicursally (in one stroke), making it a popular talisman of protection against spirits.

The Valknut's three interlocking shapes and nine points suggest rebirth, pregnancy, and cycles of reincarnation. The nine points are also suggestive of the Nine Worlds (and the nine fates) of Norse mythology. Their interwoven shape suggests the belief of the interrelatedness of the three realms of earth, hel, and the heavens, and the nine domains they encompass. The Valknut is also an important symbol to many followers of the Odinist faith, who often wear it as a symbol of the faith.
 

C.

Shield Knot: is an ancient and nearly universal symbol. The shield knot has been used for thousands of years by a variety of cultures for protection and warding.

While the common design is most often associated with the Celts and ancient Norse, the most basic form is much older. Later, it was used in the Kabbalah as a symbol of the Shema, the prayer/spell to invoke the four Archangels; it is the origin of the "Qabbalistic Cross" ritual still used today. This knot is sometimes referred to as the "Earth Square" or St. Hans cross.

The Norse and Celtic versions of the knot are used for the same purposes of protection but are related to the fourfold solar cross.
 

D.

Swastika: is a type of solar cross, with arms bent at right angles, suggesting a whirling or turning motion. Long before the symbol was co-opted as an emblem of Hitler's Nazi party, it was a sacred symbol to Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist religions, as well as in Norse, Basque, Baltic, and Celtic Paganism.

The name Swastika is derived from the Sanskrit language, from "su," meaning "good," and "vasti"," meaning "being" (together; well being) In India, it is used as a fertility and good luck charm.
 

E. Triple Horn of Odin: is a stylized emblem of the Norse God Odin. This symbol consists of three interlocked drinking horns, and is commonly worn or displayed as a sign of commitment to the Odinist faith. The horns figure in the mythological stories of Odin and are recalled in traditional Norse toasting rituals.